The process consisted of a membership trawl to develop a set of agreed principles of Social Marketing to underpin the definition. The process also included an online members vote on these principles; a summary of the survey results is set out in annex two. All members of the participating associations were given opportunities to see the developing definition, comment and make suggestions for improvements. The definition was further refined through an iterative process of drafting and comment by the working group and input from the Boards of the supporting associations. Five considerations were taken into account when developing the definition:


Because search marketing is a digital marketing field, a career in search marketing requires marketers to not only have a marketing background, but also a firm understanding of the ever-changing world of social media, search engine analytics, and broad-based online marketing. An effective search marketing team will be made up of individuals who are extremely comfortable with technology trends and have the creativity to help a website stand out from the crowd.
It was recognised that the definition would be a consensus statement; it would not seek to limit or curtail debate about the nature of Social Marketing. The consensus definitions purpose would be to enable the supporting associations to develop a common narrative about the nature of Social Marketing that would assist in furthering their collective aim of capturing and spreading good practice.
Cross-platform measurement: The number of marketing channels continues to expand, as measurement practices are growing in complexity. A cross-platform view must be used to unify audience measurement and media planning. Market researchers need to understand how the Omni-channel affects consumer's behaviour, although when advertisements are on a consumer's device this does not get measured. Significant aspects to cross-platform measurement involves de-duplication and understanding that you have reached an incremental level with another platform, rather than delivering more impressions against people that have previously been reached (Whiteside, 2016).[43] An example is ‘ESPN and comScore partnered on Project Blueprint discovering the sports broadcaster achieved a 21% increase in unduplicated daily reach thanks to digital advertising’ (Whiteside, 2016).[43] Television and radio industries are the electronic media, which competes with digital and other technological advertising. Yet television advertising is not directly competing with online digital advertising due to being able to cross platform with digital technology. Radio also gains power through cross platforms, in online streaming content. Television and radio continue to persuade and affect the audience, across multiple platforms (Fill, Hughes, & De Franceso, 2013).[46]
With the development of this system, the price is growing under the high level of competition. Many advertisers prefer to expand their activities, including increasing search engines and adding more keywords. The more advertisers are willing to pay for clicks, the higher the ranking for advertising, which leads to higher traffic.[15] PPC comes at a cost. The higher position is likely to cost $5 for a given keyword, and $4.50 for a third location. A third advertiser earns 10% less than the top advertiser, while reducing traffic by 50%.[15] The investors must consider their return on investment and then determine whether the increase in traffic is worth the increase.

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